South & Southeast Asia

ASCL 50s: SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN LITERATURES AND LINGUISTICS

ASCL 51s: SOUTH AND SOUTHEST ASIAN RELIGIONS

ASCL 51.01 /REL 9 Hinduism

An introductory survey of the Hindu religious tradition of South Asia from 1500 B.C.E. down to the present day. Emphasis will be given to the historical development of elite, Sanskritic Hinduism and its constant interaction with popular and local traditions.

  • Ohnuma
  • Dist: TMV; WCult: NW
  • Not to be offered in the period from 20F through 21S

ASCL 51.02/REL 19.06 Modern Hinduism: Colonial and Nationalist Contexts

This course presents diverse texts and media from the British colonial period to the present in a patchwork history of Hindu nationalism, or Hindutva, and rival voices. Alongside primary texts representing historical thinkers prominent in the formulation of a modern Hinduism—Vivekananda and Gandhi, among others—we will engage the arguments of contemporary theorists of culture, media, and modernity in India, as well as four popular films.

  • Dist: TMV; WCult: NW
  • Not to be offered in the period from 20F through 21S

ASCL 51.03/REL 18 Indian Buddhism

An introductory survey of the Buddhism of South Asia from its beginnings in the 6th century B.C.E. to its eventual demise in the 12th century C.E. Emphasis will be given to the major beliefs, practices, and institutions characteristic of Indian Buddhism, the development of its different varieties (Hinayana, Mahayana, and Vajrayana), and its impact upon South Asian civilization at large.

  • Ohnuma
  • Dist: TMV; WCult: NW
  • Not to be offered in the period from 20F through 21S

ASCL 51.04/REL 41.05 Tibetan Buddhism

An introductory survey of Buddhism in Tibet from its inception in the 8th century until the present day. Emphasis will be given to the central doctrines, practices, and institutions characteristic of Tibetan Buddhism, its development of various popular and elite religious ideals (householder, nun, monk, scholar, solitary hermit, crazy yogi, and female dakini), and its evolving identity in the West. Open to all.

  • Seton
  • 21S: 10A

ASCL 52s: SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN ART, FILM, AND PERFORMANCE

ASCL 52.01/ MUS 17.02 Music and Dance of North India

This experimental interdisciplinary course explores traditional North Indian (Hindustani) music and dance as both an artistic practice and a cultural system. Course work combines regular group lessons on the tabla—the principal percussion instrument in the performance of Hindustani raga—with weekly reading, listening, and viewing assignments focusing on Indian music theory, history, and aesthetics. Visiting artists will demonstrate the central dance, instrumental, and vocal forms of Hindustani performing arts. No prior musical experience required.

  • Levin/ Sandeep Das (visitor)
  • Dist: ART; WCult: NW
  • Not to be offered in the period from 20F through 21S
     

ASCL 53s: SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN CULTURAL STUDIES

ASCL 53.01 /REL19.13/COLT55.01 Divine Love: Desire, Sex, and Romance in Traditions of India

"You've got the money, but we've got the love." Indians comparing their country with this one often make judgments in these terms. But isn't love a human universal? In this course we will examine how religious texts have helped construct Indian attitudes towards desire, sex, and romance. We will tour various historical genres: erotic how-to, epic, mystical poetry, drama. The ideal bond in many of these texts unites a human subject with a divine lover.

  • Dist: TMV, WCult: NW
  • Not to be offered in the period from 20F through 21S

ASCL 54s: SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN HISTORY

ASCL 54.01 Political Economy of Development in Colonial and Postcolonial South Asia

In 1947, India was partitioned into India and Pakistan. Since then, these countries have wrestled with issues of governance and development, but colonial rule casts a long shadow over their efforts. This course introduces students to the complex politico-economic landscape of the subcontinent by examining how the idea of development changes in modern South Asian history. How are developmental efforts embedded in contexts of politics, society, and culture? How do political systems affect decisions? This course considers these questions by examining themes such as the colonial state's construction of railway and irrigation networks; Gandhi's critique of industrialization; Nehru's vision of an industrial economy; the challenges posed by Partition and militarization of Pakistan; the Green Revolution; and the onset of economic deregulation.

  • Dist: INT or SOC; WCult: NW
  • Not to be offered in the period from 20F through 21S

ASCL 54.02 Ethnic Identities in Modern South Asia

South Asian society has long been represented by rigid systems of hierarchy. Caste and religion have been represented as inexorable determinants of social possibility. Yet, what are the ways in which people have actually identified themselves, and to what extent is hierarchical identification a product of South Asia's modern history? This course explores the problems of social and cultural difference in South Asia. How do modern institutions such as the census and electoral politics shape the way in which these problems are perceived today? What are the effects of the introduction of English education? This course explores the problems of social and cultural difference in South Asia. We focus on religion, caste, language, and gender as factors shaping ethnic identity in South Asia.

  • Dist: INT or SOC; WCult: NW
  • Not to be offered in the period from 20F through 21S

ASCL 54.03 /HIST 92.05 The City in Modern South Asia

South Asian cities are currently undergoing massive demographic and spatial transformations. These cannot be understood without a consideration of both the specific history of South Asia and a broader account of urban change. This course examines these changes in historical perspective and situates urban South Asia within a global context. How did colonial rule transform cities such as Delhi, Lahore, and Bombay? How were the differing ideologies of India and Pakistan mapped onto new capitals such as Chandigarh and Islamabad? How are ethnic pasts and techno futures reconciled in booming cities such as Bangalore and Mumbai? How are slums produced and what are the experiences of people living in them? What are the connections between the urban environment and political mobilization? We consider a range of sources, including scholarly literature, films, and short stories.

  • Dist: SOC; WCult: NW
  • Not to be offered in the period from 20F through 21S

ASCL 54.04/HIST 92.06 Partition in South Asia

In the years leading to 1947, nationalist activism against the British and tensions between Hindus and Muslims escalated in the Indian subcontinent. This culminated in Partition and the emergence of the nations of India and Pakistan. Independence was marred, however, by the bloodshed accompanying the mass movements of Muslims into Pakistan and Hindus into India. What were the factors leading to this juxtaposition of triumphal Independence with shameful Partition? What were the implications of Partition for ordinary people? How have memories of Partition continued to affect powerfully politics and culture in the subcontinent? This seminar investigates such questions using a wide variety of materials including films, memoir, fiction, and scholarly works. This course follows recent scholarship in focusing on the long-term implications of Partition for the subcontinent. Hence, while we certainly will investigate the events leading up to Partition, our emphasis will be on understanding the effects of Partition on the lives of ordinary people during and after.

  • Dist: INT or SOC; WCult: NW
  • Not to be offered in the period from 20F through 21S

ASCL 54.05 Animals and Environmental History in the US and India

Historically, the notion of what it means to be human has been inextricably linked with the non-human world. Through readings, films and class discussions focused on the US and India, students will gain insights into the relatively new field of the post-humanities. The notion of post-human has another meaning relevant to our course, literally signifying a world after human beings. Over the semester students will learn about the anthropocene, a concept that describes this as an age where human beings exert an unprecedented geological force on their environment through consumption of oil, natural gas and fossil fuels. We will explore the domestication of animals, pet culture and the consumption of animals. This course examines current debates in environmental history focusing in India and the world and animal studies.

  • Dist: SOC, WCult: NW
  • Not to be offered in the period from 20F through 21S

ASCL 54.06 Ethnicities and the Environment in India

Focusing on the region of South Asia with special attention to indigenous communities and ethnicities bound by religion or language, this course is designed to introduce students to the latest debates on the concept of 'ethnicity.' We will examine concepts such as indigeneity, nationalism, nativism and eco-xenophobia. Students will explore pre-national modes of social and cultural identity. Throughout the course, debates in the discipline of history will inform our discussion of themes and concepts.

  • Dist: SOC, WCult: NW
  • Not to be offered in the period from 20F through 21S

ASCL 54.07/HIST 75 Colonialism, Development, and the Environment in Africa and Asia

This course examines the environmental history of Africa and Asia, focusing on the period of European colonialism and its aftermath. Topics include deforestation and desertification under colonial rule; imperialism and conservation; the consequences of environmental change for rural Africans and Asians; irrigation, big dams and transformations in water landscapes; the development of national parks and their impact on wildlife and humans; the environmentalism of the poor; urbanization and pollution; and global climate change in Africa and Asia. Open to all classes.

  • Haynes
  • Dist: INT or SOC, WCult: NW
  • 21W:10

ASCL 54.08/HIST 76 History of Modern South Asia

This course examines the history of South Asia during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Themes of the course include the development of British imperialism, the impact of colonial rule on Indian rural society and economy, processes of cultural change, the development of nationalism, the historical role of Gandhi, the emergence of Hindu-Muslim conflict, and the character of post-colonial South Asia. Open to all classes.

  • Haynes
  • Dist: INT or SOC, WCult: CI
  • 21S:10

ASCL 54.09/HIST 26 The Vietnam War

This course examines the conflict which Americans call "The Vietnam War" as a major event in the 20th century histories of both the United States and Vietnam. In addition to exploring the key decisions made by U.S. and Vietnamese leaders, students will also learn about the experiences of ordinary soldiers and civilians. This course incorporates multiple American and Vietnamese sources and perspectives, and also investigates multiple explanations of the war's origins and outcome. Open to all classes.

  • Miller
  • Dist: INT or SOC, WCult: WC
  • Not to be offered in the period from 20F through 21S

ASCL 54.10/HIST 90.09 Global South Asia

Home to some of the world's richest people and biggest companies, South Asia has been the source of countless stories of success. Yet there's more to these stories than meets the eye. What makes South Asia important globally and what is the history behind South Asia's recent rise? Global South Asia answers these questions by looking at the ways the region has been connected to other parts of the world throughout history.

  • Lhost
  • Dist: SOC; WCult: NW
  • 20F: 2A

ASCL 54.11/HIST 5.11 Gandhi, 20th Century India and the World

This course explores the history of modern India through the figure of Mahatma Gandhi. After exploring early developments in Gandhi's life and his philosophy of non-violence, we will examine the role of Gandhi and of his image in major political developments in India. We will also take up many key issues relating to Gandhian thought, including Hindu-Muslim relations, caste, gender and sexuality, and social equality. Finally, we will discuss Gandhi's legacy in India and globally.

  • Haynes
  • DIST: INT or SOC, WCult: NW
  • 21W:12

ASCL 55s: SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN ANTHROPOLGY AND SOCIOLOGY

ASCL 55.01/ANTH 32 Anthropology of Tibet and the Himalayas

This course introduces students to the peoples and cultures of Tibet and the greater Himalayan region (Nepal, northern India, Bhutan). We examine the cultural, ecological, political, religious, and economic interfaces that define life on the northern and southern slopes of Earth's greatest mountain range. In addition to learning about Himalayan and Tibetan lifeways, we will also learn about how these mountainous parts of Asia have figured into occidental imaginings, from the earliest adventurers to contemporary travelers.

  • Bauer
  • Dist: SOC; WCult: NW
  • 21W: 12

ASCL 56s: SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN GEOGRAPHY AND ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

ASCL 57s: South and Southeast Asian Government and Economics

ASCL 59s: SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIA

ASCL 59.01/WGSS 91 Foreign Study in India

Credit for this course is given to students who successfully complete this course at the University of Hyderabad while on the ASCL/WGSS FSP.

  • University of Hyderabad faculty
  • WCult: NW

ASCL 59.02/WGSS 92 Topics TBA Foreign Study in India

Credit for this course is given to students who successfully complete this course at the University of Hyderabad while on the ASCL/WGSS FSP

  • University of Hyderabad faculty
  • WCult: NW

ASCL 59. 03/WGSS 90 Topics TBA Foreign Study in India

Credit for this course, taught by the FSP director, is given to students who successfully complete this course at the University of Hyderabad while on the ASCL/WGSS FSP. Topics vary from year to year.

  • WCult: NW

ASCL 59.04 Intensive Foreign Study in Vietnam

Credit for this course, taught by the FSP director, is given to students who successfully complete this course at the University of Hyderabad while on the ASCL/WGSS FSP. Topics vary from year to year.

  • Miller, Lan
  • 21 Winterim